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Is This Woman Violating Subway Etiquette Or Living Her Damn Life The Way We All Wish We Could?

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Is This Woman Violating Subway Etiquette Or Living Her Damn Life The Way We All Wish We Could? The above image has torn the Gothamist Etiquette Board apart. This woman was spotted on the 1 train during this morning's rush hour commute. Is she in the wrong for for sitting in a way that's not considered "normal"—extending her legs upwards in an impressive yoga maneuver that is hurting absolutely no one, while radiating that perfectly smug look? [ more › ]
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satadru
26 days ago
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We're going to hit a point where we're all just going to start carrying lab-grade sanitizing wipes to wipe our surroundings on subways before we sit down, just like people do on airplanes.
New York, NY
steingart
28 days ago
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The only thing separating you from basically everything else in NYC is the sole of your shoe. Keep it down FFS.
Princeton, NJ
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The Jerry Springer Show ends production

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Since 1991, The Jerry Springer Show offered America an unevenly-distributed taste of its own future. But we're settled comfortably in, now, and the present has no need for its harbingers. So long, Jerry.

Syndicated talk-show staple The Jerry Springer Show has ceased production of new episodes, a source confirms to TVLine, and will only air pre-taped episodes and repeats when it moves to The CW this fall. (Broadcasting & Cable first reported the news.) The CW is still considering ordering fresh episodes of Springer down the line — the deal is for multiple years — but as of now, the show has finished filming.

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steingart
31 days ago
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Wait, they’ve made new springers until 2018?
Princeton, NJ
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Kevin Roose: ‘How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Electric Scooters’

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Kevin Roose, writing for The New York Times:

Tech hubris on wheels — what’s not to loathe?

But I wanted to experience the scooter craze for myself. So for a week, I used shared e-scooters as my primary mode of transportation. I rode them to meetings, ran errands across town and went for long joy rides on the Venice Beach boardwalk. In all, I took more than a dozen scooter rides, from just a few blocks to several miles.

And here’s my verdict: E-scooters might look and feel kind of dorky, but they aren’t an urban menace or a harbinger of the apocalypse. In fact — sigh — they’re pretty great.

That’s pretty much the consensus here in San Jose from fellow WWDC attendees. We didn’t want to like these scooters but we do. The big problem is parking them — it’s just wrong that people abandon them anywhere and everywhere. The other problem is people who ride them on sidewalks rather than in the street where they belong.

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steingart
40 days ago
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Had the same reaction in LA this year. If done right this could be wonderful.
Princeton, NJ
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USA Today Serves Different Site to EU Visitors That Is Way Faster Than Regular Site

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Marcel Freinbichler:

Because of #GDPR, USA Today decided to run a separate version of their website for EU users, which has all the tracking scripts and ads removed. The site seemed very fast, so I did a performance audit. How fast the internet could be without all the junk! 5.2MB → 500KB

They went from a load time of more than 45 seconds to 3 seconds, from 124 (!) JavaScript files to 0, and from a total of more than 500 requests to 34.

The privacy implications of all the JavaScript that gets loaded for user-tracking is alarming enough, but practically speaking the bigger problem is that it makes the web slow. Web developers, generally speaking, are terrible at their craft. 124 JavaScript files and over 500 HTTP requests for a single goddamn web page is just shameful.

Again I say: the web would be better off if browsers had never added support for scripting.

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steingart
50 days ago
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This is such a short sighted view it boggles the mind. It reduces the web to one way delivery, it might as well just be an electronic newspaper. Web apps are wonderful and important, and scripting is key .


Slow and leaky code is just bad code, but that doesn’t mean that there should be no code at all....
Princeton, NJ
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1 public comment
adrianlafond
50 days ago
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In all fairness, it's not web developers. It's sales and marketing. It's far easier to say, "company X will pay us $x to put this script on our site", than to calculate the data to say "putting that script on our site will slow it down n seconds on typical home broadband and y seconds on typical LTE network which will lose us ?? visitors per day" ... so that just embedding the tracking script usually always wins.
Brooklyn NY USA

Any Company Using Facebook for User ID Is Foolish

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Nick Statt, reporting for The Verge:

Facebook is adding a dating layer to its main mobile app, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced today during the company’s F8 developers conference keynote in San Jose, California. The features are a long time coming for the 14-year-old social network, which has allowed users to broadcast whether they’re single or in a relationship since it first went live in February 2004.

The move will likely transform Facebook, with its more than 2.2 billion monthly active users, into a major competitor of Match Group, which owns and operates mobile dating app Tinder and popular dating platform OkCupid. Match Group’s stock plummeted by more than 17 percent as soon as the news was announced.

John Kneeland on Twitter:

Step 1: get dating apps to build themselves on your platform’s data
Step 2: cut them off from your platform’s data with no warning
Step 3: build a competitor to dating apps with the data you are now keeping to yourself

Seems kinda antitrust-ish…

It should be illegal, given Facebook’s monopoly status. But every company that has ever trusted Facebook like this should have known better all along. There was never any reason for Tinder to trust Facebook not to do this, and a bunch of reasons to suspect they would. Yet even today, when you go to sign up for Tinder, they heavily steer you toward signing up via Facebook; the option to sign up using your phone number is so faint it’s hard to read. (And who wants to share their phone number? Why not email?)

Facebook looks like the rapacious Gates-era “I think I’ll have all the mashed potatoes” Microsoft. Tinder looks like fools.

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satadru
76 days ago
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This is inevitable. What other company has the data to narrow your search for a partner to "White Nationalist Russia sympathizer pee fetishists who are willing to sell out their country to keep the colored people down", is willing to sell the ability to promote such a group to those who might be on the edge of thinking that's fine, and also has no qualms whatsoever about doing so aside from the occasional heavily choreographed Kabuki hand-wringing?
New York, NY
steingart
76 days ago
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The Grubes has clearly never used Tinder (praise jebus). I'm guessing the Facebook dating community will have very different goals
Princeton, NJ
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Philip Glass: “I expected to have a day job for the rest of my life”

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I enjoyed reading Lolade Fadulu’s interview with Philip Glass about the composer’s early life and how he made a living in NYC before being able to fully support himself with his music (which didn’t happen until he was in his early 40s). As a boy, his mother made sure he got a musical education and his job at his father’s record store exposed him to the idea that people paid money for art:

To this day, among my earliest memories was someone would give my father $5 and he’d hand them a record. So the exchange of money for art, I thought that was normal. I thought that’s what everybody did. I never thought there was anything wrong about making money.

As an adult, Glass worked odd jobs (plumber, mover, cab driver) to have the independence to work on his music:

I had an ensemble at the time. I would go out and play for three weeks. We would come back from the tour, and we usually had lost money so I had to make money immediately. I put an ad in the paper. My cousin and I ran the company, and I moved furniture for about three or four or five weeks. Then I went on tour again. Again, we lost money.

That went on for years. I thought it was going to go on for the rest of my life, actually. It never occurred to me that I would be able to make a living, really, from writing music. That happened kind of by accident.

I was interested in jobs that were part-time, where I had a lot of independence, where I could work when I wanted to. I wasn’t interested in working in an office where everything would be very regimented.

As his musical career took off, Glass continued to take his other work seriously. From a 2001 profile of Glass in The Guardian:

Throughout this period, Glass supported himself as a New York cabbie and as a plumber, occupations that often led to unusual encounters. “I had gone to install a dishwasher in a loft in SoHo,” he says. “While working, I suddenly heard a noise and looked up to find Robert Hughes, the art critic of Time magazine, staring at me in disbelief. ‘But you’re Philip Glass! What are you doing here?’ It was obvious that I was installing his dishwasher and I told him I would soon be finished. ‘But you are an artist,’ he protested. I explained that I was an artist but that I was sometimes a plumber as well and that he should go away and let me finish.”

But after Einstein on the Beach dazzled critics at the Metropolitan Opera, Glass’s days in the driver’s seat of a cab were limited:

The day after the performance, Glass was back driving his taxi: “I vividly remember the moment, shortly after the Met adventure,” he says, “when a well-dressed woman got into my cab. After noting the name of the driver, she leaned forward and said: ‘Young man, do you realise you have the same name as a very famous composer’.”

Glass is my favorite composer, but as much as I love his music, I might appreciate the way he has approached his work and career almost as much.

Tags: interviews   Lolade Fadulu   music   NYC   Philip Glass   working
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steingart
83 days ago
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Princeton, NJ
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